Artificial Intelligence {A.I.) Beats Swiftie and Tunnels as Top Word of 2023 for Global English According to the Global Language Monitor.

CONTACT:   For Video or Verbal Interviews call +1.737.215.7750

For Immediate Release (End-of-year 2023)

Artificial Intelligence {A.I.) Beats Swiftie and Tunnels as Top Word of 2023 for Global English According to the Global Language Monitor.

Global Language Monitor’s official estimate of the number of words in the English language as of January 1, 2024, is:

1,080.502.4

AUSTIN, TX, December 27,  2023 - January 3, 2024 Metanewswire

Artificial Intelligence {A.I.) Beats Swiftie and Tunnels as Top Word of 2023 for Global English.

‘Artificial Intelligence’ (A.I.) seems to be on the mind of every person on the planet,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of Global Language Monitor, “though there is little consensus on whether A.I. bodes well or ill for the future of humankind”.

For the first-time this decade words of the pandemic no longer dominated the conversation of the English linguasphere.

“We also noticed,” Payack continued, “the English language ensconcing itself ever more deeply into the professional language used in academia, science, technology, politics, commerce, transportation, and entertainment”.

The Top Words or Phrases of 2023 follow:

  1. “Artificial Intelligence (or “A.I.”) — As humankind hurdles toward the so-called ”Singularity,” where computers surpass human intelligence with possible civilization-ending consequences.  (A.I. is a top contender for GLM’s “Top Technology Terms Everybody Uses but Few Truly Understand”.)

 

  1. “Swiftie(s)” – Enthusiastic, some would say rabid, phenomena describing the followers of pop and country singer-songwriter Taylor Alison Swift. Her tours are amassing billions of dollars in total revenue.

 

  1. “Tunnels” — Symbolic of the entire Hamas-Israeli conflict beginning October 7th. 2023.

 

  1. “Worldwide Migratory Crisis” – From the U.S.-Mexican border toNortheastern Europe, South Asia, and North Africa.

 

  1. “War in Ukraine,” – Nearly seven hundred days in, a deadly stalemate ensues, with Putin desperately looking for a way out.

 

  1. “Climate Change,”- including Derecho, Smoke, Heat Dome, Rising Sea Levels, and the like. Already one of the Top Words of the Decade—and probably one of the Top Words of the 21st Century, also.

 

  1. “Balloon” – The Chinese spy balloon that circumnavigated top military installations over the Central U.S. before being downed off the South Carolina Coast.

 

  1. “Implosion” — the apparent fate of the Titan submersible on its ill-fated journey to the Titanic at 10,500 feet under the North Atlantic off Newfoundland.

 

  1. EMP” – Electromagnetic Pulse, according to the U.S. Government, a 1.4 Megaton bomb detonated above Kansas would destroy most of the electronics in the continental United States. (See Chinese spy balloon.)

 

  1. “Turmoil” – (See Vladimir Putin in …) Since the invasion of Ukraine, Putin’s Leadership skills have been increasingly questioned internally.

 

  1. “Supply Chain” — Supply chains take decades to set up but can quickly crumble. Newest concerns are the Red Sea shipping channels.

 

Bonus:  Tending Top Word of the 21stCentury:  “Fusion Power” – A relatively quiet press briefing in December announced a colossal moment in the history of Humankind (see note below.)

 

Paul JJ Payack’s Note:  Though scarcely an echo in the global media at the time, this event, perhaps, presages not only the Top Word of the of the Decade, Century, and, we dare say, perhaps the Third Millennium (if our species manages to survive that long).

 

The Background:  Scientists studying fusion energy at the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence National Laboratory in Livermore, California blasted a small almost minute nub of diamond encased frozen hydrogen with the power of some 200 giant lasers.  In less than one hundred trillionths of a second, a massive outpouring of neutrons signified a fusion reaction had produced about 50% more energy than was used to create it.  This was the long-sought-for Ignition Event, that signified a new era in History — Humans had harnessed, to an infinitesimally small degree, the mechanism that powers the Sun, the stars, the galaxy, and the Universe, itself.

 

Top Words of Global English for the year 2022 by The Global Language Monitor follow.

Rank/Word or Phrase/Comments

  1. Denier — Concept encompasses ‘Hater,’ ‘Cancel Culture,’ and the ‘Deniers’ of an ever-expanding list of facts, fallacies, and beliefs.
    2. Covid — Covid, one of the Top Words in Global English, again
    3. Right to Life — Pro-life position (Compare No. 19)
    4. Ukraine — Top non-Pandemic word in 2022
    5. Zero — In Retail, ‘zero’ used to mean ‘nothing’, but now embodies ‘goodness,’ ‘health,’ and ‘beauty’.
    6. Price of gas/petrol — Gasoline prices up 49% year over year.
    7. Vaccine — No. 2 word of the Pandemic
    8. Variant — Variant after variant after variant
    9. Climate change — One of the top phrases of the CENTURY thus far
    10. Pandemic — Pandemics tend to last for a number of years (or decades)
    11. Supply Chain — Supply chains take decades to set up but can quickly crumble
    12. Booster Dose — Boosted, double boosted, triple boosted …
    13. Diesel — Warning: Civilization does not run on gasoline; it runs on diesel
    14. Cancel Culture — Forced to quit by intense social media pressure
    15. Inflation Definition — Too much money chasing too few goods
    16. Global Warming — Again, one of the top ten words of the century
    17. Democracy — 600% stronger than ‘Democracy at Risk’
    18. Omicron — Coronavirus Omicron variant; the first of many to come
    19. Abortion Rights — A relatively modest position on the list (No. 3, ‘Right to life’ is 400% stronger)
    20. Donald Trump — After years of sparing Joe and the Donald are still neck and neck..

Creative Commons CC 2023 by the Global Language Monitor

Global Language Monitor began recording the Top Words of the year in 2000 to document the history of the 21st Century through the English language, the world’s first truly global language. The words are culled throughout the English-speaking world, which as of January 2024 stands at 2.58 billion people.

Global Language Monitor’s official estimate of the number of words in the English language as of January 1, 2024, is:

1,080.502.4

The First Anglo-Saxon word recorded in Runes is the word for ‘bread’.  It can, therefore, be considered the first Old English word in A.D. 451.

English has continued to churn out about 14.7 neologisms per day — about 5366 words a year. However not all words are considered worthy to be added to the most authoritative and respected English-language dictionaries, the unabridged and various editions of: the Oxford English Dictionary (UK), Merriam Websters (US), American Heritage (US), Collins (UK), and Macquarie (AUS).

Global Language Monitor employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing areal-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the internet, blogosphere, and the top 300,000 print and electronic global media as well as new social media sources as they emerge. In addition, the Global Language Monitor also tracks the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st Century.

About Global Language Monitor

Based in Austin, Texas, the Global Language Monitor collectively documents, analyzes, and tracks trends in Global English, the world’s first truly global language The company is known for its Word of the Year, political analysis, college and university rankings, high-tech buzzwords, and media analytics.

 

For more information, visit Languagemonitor.com.

Paul JJ Payack
Global Language Monitor
+1 737-215-7750
pauljjpayack@gmail.com

 

Buyer’s Remorse? It Happens With TopColleges, Too. And More Often Than You Might Imagine

It’s NotToo Late to Apply to College.  Even now.

It’s a well-know fact among admissions counselors that hundreds of thousands of first-year students are already planning their exit strategies from the schools they worked so hard to gain admission.

Change of Plans can occur do to any number of factors from homesickness to the sudden realization that the school of your dreams might, on closer inspection, has the potential to becoming a colossal miscalclation.

Thererfore, last-minute, College Applications Require Special Attention.  We can help turn your dilemma into an opportunity for your target colleges (and you, too)!

Admissions Essay:  Your essay is critical here since it’ s your opportunity to explain, in as much detail as you need, how you arrived at your decision to attend this college and why at this particular time.   Cost:  $99./ essay.  Includes thirty-minute ZOOM meeting.

Complete appliticaon package review.  Cost: $150. /  application.

Counseling Sessionson weretospp[ly     $100. per hour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The GLM Institute Introduction

The Global Language Monitor, the leading Global English portal, has launched, the GLM Institute. The GLM Institute provides a ready means for professionals worldwide to master the essentials of Global English, and to have their efforts certified. And no knowledge of English is more important that the ability to communicate through the written word. This is formally known as ‘expository writing’ or more simply, ’exposition’

New English Words Since A.D. 451

The First Anglo-Saxon word recorded in Runes is the word for ‘bread’.  It can, therefore, be considered the first Old English word in A.D. 451.

Many global professionals have picked up a basic knowledge of English through the Internet, Hollywood movies and music. However, it is a wholly differing skill to communicate complex thoughts and ideas through the written word. Lacking this essential skill can prove to be a subtle yet very real barrier to advancement in their education and/or careers.
According to Harvard Business School, those ‘… skilled in management, leadership, & analytical reasoning are in high demand by companies across industries’ and will remain so for the remainder of the decade, and beyond. And no skill is more strategic to enhancing career prospects than the ability to communicate strategic thinking skills through the adept use of Global English, or even gaining a working knowledge of the world’s first truly global language. This is the skillset that the Global Language Monitor Institute will provide you in the Essentials of Global English Certificate program.

Developed over forty years, variations of this program have been taught at Fortune 500 companies. colleges and universities, and financial institutions, among others. Portions of this program were developed at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, just outside of Boston.
Students can immediately register for the individual courses and will receive a 20% discount for any and all certificates they purchase with their original registration.
The Essentials of Global English program consists of a dozen of individual certificates and a final Capstone indicating mastery of the subject.

Initial course offerings from the Global Language Monitor Institute follow — individually, with significant discounts applied to ‘bundles’ of two or more offerings. (Bundles must be paid for at initial registration.)

Students receive a Certificate of Completion or Certificate of Achievement along with a badge that can be readily added to one’s resumé or CV. Additionally. they can receive the Honor’s marks or ‘With Distinction or ‘With Highest Distinction’ for maintaining appropriate Honors-level grades.\

 

The Global Language Monitor was founded in Silicon Valley in 2003 by Paul JJ Payack on the premise that new technologies were needed to understand the world of Big Data and “…to examine the totality of Global English with the tools now available to better understand the underlying trends that shape our words and, hence, our world. Our goal remains to detect the small changes in the language that often presage titanic shifts in the way humans communicate”.

Register for GLM Institute Practicums Now

The Isle Skellig:  Where the Monks preserved the works of the Greek and Roman Authors, thus saving Western Civilization from oblivion

Global Language Monitor Institute Now Accepting New Students

 

 

Scale Your Career to New Heights with a Certificate of Proficiency in Global English

Take Any Course, Any Time, Any Where™

By the Global Language Monitor, the Authority in Global English

 

According to Harvard Business School, those ‘… skilled in management, leadership, & analytical reasoning are in high demand by companies across industries’ and will remain so for the remainder of the decade, and beyond.  And no skill is more strategic to enhancing career prospects than the ability to communicate strategic thinking skills through the adept use of Global English, or even gaining a working knowledge of the world’s first truly global language.  This is the skillset that the Global Language Monitor provides and certifies.

GLM Institute 2023 Class Offerings and Fee Schedule Follow

All students must complete the Registration Form to enroll in classes.

Discounts (20%) are automatically applied when enrolling in (and paying for) two or more classes at registration.

Students must complete any three classes before being eligible for the Capstone.

Certificates are awarded for each completed class.

Certificates are marked ‘With Distinction” or “With Highest Distinction” for achieving honor grades of A or B.

Pricing ($USD)

  • Registration:  $75.
  • 100-level courses:   $250.
  • 200-level courses:   $350.
  • Capstone Level:  $525.
  • Printed Certificates:  $35.
  • Digital Badges:  Free

     

The Global Language Monitor Names “Artificial Intelligence” or “A.I” the Top Word or Phrase of the Year 2023 Thus Far

The Global Language Monitor Names “Artificial Intelligence” or “A.I” the Top Word or Phrase of the Year 2023 Thus Far for Global English

Words of the Pandemic No Longer Dominate

Global Language MonitorCreative Commons CC 2022 by the Global Language Monitor

The Top Words or Phrase of the Year 2023 Thus Far (@WOTY2023) for Global English

The Global Language Monitor Names “Artificial Intelligence” or “A.I” the Top Word or Phrase of the Year 2023 Thus Far for Global English

Words of the Pandemic No Longer Dominate

AUSTIN, TX, UNITED STATES, July 4, 2023; MetaNewswire

For Immediate Release Fourth of July Week in the U.S.\

“For the first-time this decade words of the pandemic no longer dominate the conversation in Global English,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor.  “This year we observed the continued acceleration of the spread of English into every nook-and-cranny of the planet.

“We also noticed the English language ensconcing itself ever more deeply into the professional language used in academia, science, technology, politics, commerce, transportation, and entertainment.

The Top Words or Phrases of 2023 thus far are as follows:

  1. “Artificial Intelligence (or “A.I.”) — As humankind hurdles toward the so-called ”Singularity,” where computers surpass human intelligence with possible civilization-ending consequences. (A.I. is also a top contender for GLM’s “Top Technology Terms Everybody Uses but Few Truly Understand”.)
  2. “Balloon” – The Chinese spy balloon that circumnavigated top military installations over the Central U.S. before being downed off the South Carolina Coast.
  3. “Implosion,” the apparent fate of the Titan submersible on its ill-fated journey to the Titanic at 10,500 feet under the North Atlantic off Newfoundland.
  4. EMP” – Electromagnetic Pulse, according to the U.S. Government, a 1.4 Megaton bomb detonated above Kansas would destroy most of the electronics in the continental United States. (See Chinese spy balloon.)
  5. “Worldwide Migratory Crisis” – From the U.S.-Mexican border to Eastern Europe, South Asia, and North Africa,
  6. “Climate Change,” including Derecho, Smoke, Heat Dome, Rising Sea Levels, and the like.
  7. “War in Ukraine,” – Some five hundred days in, a deadly stalemate ensues.
  8. “Vladimir Putin in Turmoil” — 
  9. “Death of Queen Elizabeth,” –The U.K.’s longest-reigning monarch leaves a legacy perhaps never to be matched.
  10. “Fusion Power” – A relatively quiet press briefing in December announced a colossal moment in the history of Humankind:

 

Paul JJ Payack’s Note:  Though scarcely an echo in the global media at the time, this event, perhaps, presages not only the Top Word of the first six months of 2023, but also the word of the Year, Decade, Century, and, we dare say, perhaps the Third Millennium (if our species manages to survive that long).

The Background:  Scientists studying fusion energy at the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence National Laboratory in Livermore, California blasted a small almost minute nub of diamond encased frozen hydrogen with the power of some 200 giant lasers.  In less than one hundred trillionths of a second, a massive outpouring of neutrons signified a fusion reaction had produced about 50% more energy than was used to create it.  This was the long-sought-for Ignition Event, that signified a new era in History — Humans had harnessed, to an infinitesimally small degree, the mechanism that powers the Sun, the stars, the galaxy, and the Universe, itself.

Top Words of Global English for the year 2022 by The Global Language Monitor follow.

Rank/Word or Phrase/Comments

  1. Denier — Concept encompasses ‘Hater,’ ‘Cancel Culture,’ and the ‘Deniers’ of an ever-expanding list of facts, fallacies, and beliefs.
    Covid — Covid, one of the Top Words in Global English, again
    3. Right to Life — Pro-life position (Compare No. 19)
    4. Ukraine — Top non-Pandemic word in 2022
    5. Zero — In Retail, ‘zero’ used to mean ‘nothing’, but now embodies ‘goodness,’ ‘health,’ and ‘beauty’.
    6. Price of gas/petrol — Gasoline prices up 49% year over year.
    7. Vaccine — No. 2 word of the Pandemic
    8. Variant — Variant after variant after variant
    9. Climate change — One of the top phrases of the CENTURY thus far
    10. Pandemic — Pandemics tend to last for a number of years (or decades)
    11. Supply Chain — Supply chains take decades to set up but can quickly crumble
    12. Booster Dose — Boosted, double boosted, triple boosted …
    13. Diesel — Warning: Civilization does not run on gasoline; it runs on diesel
    14. Cancel Culture — Forced to quit by intense social media pressure
    15. Inflation Definition — Too much money chasing too few goods
    16. Global Warming — Again, one of the top ten words of the century
    17. Democracy — 600% stronger than ‘Democracy at Risk’
    18. Omicron — Coronavirus Omicron variant; the first of many to come
    19. Abortion Rights — A relatively modest position on the list (No. 3, ‘Right to life’ is 400% stronger)
    20. Donald Trump — After years of sparing Joe and the Donald are still neck and neck.
  2. Creative Commons CC 2023 by the Global Language MonitorGlobal Language Monitor began recording the Top Words of the year in 2000 to document the history of the 21st Century through the English language, the world’s first truly global language. The words are culled throughout the English-speaking world, which as of January 2023 stand at 3.85 billion people.

    Global Language Monitor’s official estimate of the number of words in the English language as of November 11, 2022 is:
    1,074,372..4

    English has continued to churn out about 14.7 neologisms per day — about 5366 words a year. However not all words are considered worthy to be added to the most authoritative and respected English-language dictionaries, the unabridged and various editions of: the Oxford English Dictionary (UK), Merriam Websters (US), American Heritage (US), Collins (UK), and Macquarie (AUS).

    Global Language Monitor employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing areal-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the internet, blogosphere, and the top 300,000 print and electronic global media as well as new social media sources as they emerge. In addition, the Global Language Monitor also tracks the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st Century.

    About Global Language Monitor

    Based in Austin, Texas, the Global Language Monitor collectively documents, analyzes, and tracks trends in Global English, the world’s first truly global language The company is known for its Word of the Year, political analysis, college and university rankings, high-tech buzzwords, and media analytics.

 

For more information, visit Languagemonitor.com.

Paul JJ Payack
Global Language Monitor
+1 737-215-7750
pauljjpayack@gmail.com
Visit us on social media:
Facebook
Twitter

Linked

The Global Language Monitor Institute

The Global Language Monitor, the leading Global English portal, has launched the GLM Institute.  The GLM Institute provides a ready means for professionals worldwide to master the essentials of Global English, and to have their efforts certified.  And no knowledge of English is more important that the ability to communicate through the written word.  This is formally known as ‘expository writing’ or more simply, ’exposition’.

Many global professionals have picked up a basic knowledge of English through the Internet, Hollywood movies and music.  However, it is a wholly differing skill to communicate complex thoughts and ideas through the written word.  Lacking this essential skill can prove to be a subtle yet very real barrier to advancement in their education and/or careers.

According to Harvard Business School, those ‘… skilled in management, leadership, & analytical reasoning are in high demand by companies across industries’ and will remain so for the remainder of the decade, and beyond.  And no skill is more strategic to enhancing career prospects than the ability to communicate strategic thinking skills through the adept use of Global English, or even gaining a working knowledge of the world’s first truly global language.  This is the skillset that the Global Language Monitor Institute will provide you in the Essentials of Global English Certificate program.

Developed over forty years, variations of this program have been taught at Fortune 500 companies. colleges and universities, and financial institutions, among others. Portions of this program were developed at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, just outside of Boston.

Six certificates will be available beginning May 2, 2023.

Students can immediately register for the individual courses and will receive a 20% discount for any and all certificates they purchase with their original registration.

The Essentials of Global English program consists of five individual certificates and a final Capstone indicating mastery of the subject.

 

Initial course offerings from the Global Language Monitor Institute follow.

  • Essentials of Global English (CC23-1116)

 — Why English (and not Mandarin, Spanish, or Arabic)?
 — Origin of the Language, a five-thousand year journey
 — Rise to Global Pre-eminence
 — Importance to your education and career

  • Mastering the Million English Words (CC23-1117)

 — An Ever-expanding Verbal Universe
 — The Key Core Vocabulary
 — Dead Languages Are Not Necessarily Dead
 — ‘Sight’ Words
 — Commonly confused Words
 — Marks of distinction

  • Fundamentals of Global Business Communications (CC23-1118)

 — Excellence in use of English propels global acceptance of new products and services
 — Clear Thinking is key to Excellence in Communications
 — Pitfalls to Avoid at All Costs

  • Technical and Scientific Communications (CC23-1119)

 — The Communication Model
 — Five Rules to Remember
 — Lessons from the Ancients, Albert Einstein, and others

  • Approaching the Marketplace of Ideas (Marketing Communications) (CC23-1120)

 — Launching New Products
 — Attacking New Markets
 — Why Most Start-ups Fail
 — Understanding your Marketplace
 — Lessons from History

  • Global English Capstone (CC23-1121)

 — The culmination of the program signifying mastery of the subject.  The program involves reviewing, the entire field with added insight and preparation for further study.

 — The Global English Capstone Certificate is awarded after completing the other modules in the Essentials of Global English program. (The two required courses, CC23-1116 and CC23-1117 and the three elective courses, CC23-1118, CC23-1119, CC23-1120).

All courses are self-paced and must be completed within the allotted timeframe. Courses are priced individually, with significant discounts applied to ‘bundles’ of three or more offerings. (Bundles must be paid for at initial registration.)

Students receive a Certificate of Completion or Certificate of Achievement along with a badge that can be readily added to one’s resumé or CV. Additionally. they can receive the Honor’s marks or ‘With Distinction or ‘With Highest Distinction’ for maintaining appropriate Honors-level grades.

The Global Language Monitor was founded in Silicon Valley in 2003 by Paul JJ Payack on the premise that new technologies were needed to understand the world of Big Data and “…to examine the totality of Global English with the tools now available to better understand the underlying trends that shape our words and, hence, our world. Our goal remains to detect the small changes in the language that often presage titanic shifts in the way humans communicate”.

The Global Language Monitor Institute Now Accepting Registrations

Stratford-upon-Avon Time

<script>(function(d, s, id) { var js, pjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//www.tickcounter.com/static/js/loader.js”; pjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, pjs); }(document, “script”, “tickcounter-sdk”));</script><a data-type=”ticker” data-id=”43048” class=”tickcounter” style=”display: block; width: 100%; position: relative; padding-bottom: 25%” title=”Ticker” href=”//www.tickcounter.com/ticker”>Ticker</a>

 

Global Language Monitor Names “Denier” Word of the Year 2022 for Global English;

Words of the Pandemic Again Dominate the only list for English Worldwide.

AUSTIN, TX, UNITED STATES, November 11 - 13, 2022   — For the third consecutive year, words of the pandemic dominate the conversation in Global English,

According to Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of the Global Language Monitor:

Paul JJ Payack, Founder

In the year 2022; we observed three major trends in the development of the English language: 1) The persistence of Pandemic-related words for the third year in a row, 2) the acceleration of the spread of the language ever wider into all corners of the planet, and 3) Global English insinuating itself ever more deeply into the language of academia, science, technology, politics, commerce, transportation, and entertainment.

Top Words of Global English for 2022 by The Global Language Monitor follow.

Rank / Word or Phrase / Comments.
1. Denier — Concept encompasses ‘Hater,’ ‘Cancel Culture,’ and the ‘Deniers’ of an ever-expanding list of facts, fallacies, and beliefs.
2. Covid — Covid, one of the Top Words in Global English, again
3. Right to Life — Pro-life position (Compare No. 19)
4. Ukraine — Top non-Pandemic word in 2022
5. Zero — In Retail, ‘zero’ used to mean ‘nothing’, but now embodies ‘goodness,’ ‘health,’ and ‘beauty’.
6. Price of gas/petrol — Gasoline prices up 49% year over year.
7. Vaccine — No. 2 word of the Pandemic
8. Variant — Variant after variant after variant
9. Climate change — One of the top phrases of the CENTURY thus far
10. Pandemic — Pandemics tend to last for a number of years (or decades)
11. Supply Chain — Supply chains take decades to set up but can quickly crumble
12. Booster Dose — Boosted, double boosted, triple boosted …
13. Diesel — Warning: Civilization does not run on gasoline; it runs on diesel
14. Cancel Culture — Forced to quit by intense social media pressure
15. Inflation Definition — Too much money chasing too few goods
16. Global Warming — Again, one of the top ten words of the century
17. Democracy — 600% stronger than ‘Democracy at Risk’
18. Omicron — Coronavirus Omicron variant; the first of many to come
19. Abortion Rights — A relatively modest position on the list (No. 3, ‘Right to life’ is 400% stronger)
20. Donald Trump — After years of sparing Joe and the Donald still neck-and-neck

21. Joe Biden — After years of sparing the Donald and Joe are still neck and neck
22. Nuclear Weapons — War in Ukraine once again brings issue to the forefront
23. Xi Jinping — Methodically executing China’s long-term policy agenda
24. Metaverse — Where cyberspace and reality collide
25. Civil War — GLM’s been tracking the inCivil War since 2003; predicts re-partition of the US later in the 21st century
26. Vladimir Putin — Under intense pressure to right the ship
27. Pumpkin Spice — Many are surprised to learn, has no pumpkin in it
28. Hater — Key component of hater, denier, Cancel Culture trichotomy
29. Democracy at risk — For the uninformed: Democracy has been at risk since Athens in 404 B.C.
30. Fungible (NFT) — The Letter F in Non-fungible Tokens
31. Regina Elisabetta II — Queen Elisabeth II
32. West Texas Crude — The benchmark price in the world’s most productive Oil Patch
33. Strategic petrol reserve — Set up for wartime emergencies; rapidly being depleted in effort to cut price at the pump
34. Royal Glyph — Perhaps the world’s first emoji; the official signature of the British Crown
35. Shrinkflation — Package gets smaller while the price remains the same; Hershey’s been doing this for 100 years
36. Neopronouns* — Dozens of new pronouns created to engender gender ‘fluidity’
37. Lockdown — Lockdown can feel like being locked up

Creative Commons CC 2022 by the Global Language Monitor

*Here is a list of gender-neutral pronouns:He/She — Zie, Sie, Ey, Ve, Tey, E
Him/Her — Zim, Sie, Em, Ver, Ter, Em
His/Her — Zir, Hir, Eir, Vis, Tem, Eir
His/Hers — Zis, Hirs, Eirs, Vers, Ters, Eirs
Himself/Herself — Zieself, Hirself, Eirself, Verself, Terself, Emself6.Global Language Monitor began recording the Top Words of the year in 2000 to document the history of the 21st Century through the English language, the world’s first truly global language. The words are culled throughout the English-speaking world, which as of January 2023 stand at 3.7 billion people.Official Estimate of the Number of Words in Global English

Global Language Monitor’s official estimate of the number of words in the English language as of November 11, 2022 is:
1,074,372.4

Official Estimate of the Number of English Words Created Every Day
14.7 words Per Day-13

English has continued to churn out about 14.7 neologisms per day — about 5366 words a year. However not all words are considered worthy to be added to the most authoritative and respected English-language dictionaries, the unabridged and various editions of: the Oxford English Dictionary (UK), Merriam Websters (US), American Heritage (US), Collins (UK), and Macquarie (AUS).

Global Language Monitor began recording the Top Words of the year in 2000 to document the history of the 21st Century through the English language, the world’s first truly global language. The words are culled throughout the English-speaking world, which as of January 2021 ranks more than 3.18 billion speakers.

Global Language Monitor employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing areal-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.nNarrativeTracker analyzes the internet, blogosphere, and the top 300,000 print and electronic global media as well as new social media sources as they emerge. In addition, the Global Language Monitor also tracks the Top Words, Phrases, and Names of the 21st Century.

About Global Language Monitor

Based in Austin, Texas, the Global Language Monitor collectively documents, analyzes, and tracks trends in Global English, the world’s first truly global language The company is known for its Word of the Year, political analysis, college and university rankings, high-tech buzzwords, and media analytics. For more information, visit Languagemonitor.com.

Paul JJ Payack
Global Language Monitor
+1 737-215-7750
pauljjpayack@gmail.com
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Paul JJ Payack

President & Chief Word Analyst
The Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas 78717
pjjp@post.harvard.edu Private Email
+1.737.215.7750 Phone
@LanguageMonitor Twitter
@pauljjpayack  Personal Twitter

GLOBAL LANGUAGE MONITOR (GLM) Names the Numerals the Top Words of the Year 2021 for Global English (#WOTY 2021)

GLM has been defining the Top Words of the 21st Century for Global English Since the Year 2000.

GLM is the only WOTY for Worldwide English

Next Big Numbers for 2022:

US:  1,000,000 Covid Deaths

World:  5,500,000 Covid Deaths

 Media Contact:  Paul JJ Payack    pjjp@post.harvard.edu, +1 (737) 215-7750

Austin, TEXAS, December 30 - January 4. The Global Language Monitor has named “the Numerals” the Top Words of the Year for 2021 for Global English.

The Covid-19 Pandemic has dominated the news in 2021 as it had in 2020.  However, It’s the numbers that accompany every story, in any language, at any time, in any medium that lift the numerals to the lofty position of Word of the Year (#WOTY).

There are, literally, hundreds of billions of permutations of the basic ten numerals   And no mention of Covid-19 is complete without a full run-down of the relevant stats.  For example, this week the media reported that “record number of U.S. COVID-19 infections, with 441,278 new cases, surpassing the previous high of about 290,000 cases reported earlier in Dec., nearly surpassing the previous daily record of 294,015 set before vaccines were widely available last January”.

The seven-day moving average is now more than 240,000 cases a day.

The Heart emoji was the Top Word of 2014 the first time a symbol took the honor, though the hashtag # also made the 2014 list.

The Top Words of the Year 2021 for Global English follow.

  1. The Numerals (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0) – Every time Covid (or one of its variants) is mentioned, it is surrounded by three to five numbers. Covid-19 currently has about 4 billion citations on Google, which are accompanied by tens of billions of supporting numbers.
  2. Covid-19 – Word of the Year in 2020, could be word of the year in 2022. perhaps for the decade? Perhaps the 21st century?
  3. Wokeness – The state of being awakened to the social distresses found amongst us. Though this appears to occur for every generation it is used by politicians as a never-before-witnessed phenomenon.  Favored by Progressives.
  4. Variant – The longer the coronavirus persists, the more variations will emerge. Remember the great plague in London in 1666?  It was merely a replay of the bubonic plague of the mid-1300s. And the Hong Kong Flu?  A replay of the Spanish Flu of the World War 1 era.
  5. The Pronouns – People have been attempting to re-define their language for their own political purposes, at least since the French Revolution. The Marxists expanded the practice, right comrade?  The practice increased during the Sexual Revolution (Ms., etc.) and continues to grow during the recent ‘racial reckoning.  And today, the Woke among us are attempting to use personal “woke pronouns” to help define their sexual orientation (and yours).

Here is a list of gender-neutral pronouns:

He/She — Zie, Sie, Ey, Ve, Tey, E

Him/Her — Zim, Sie, Em, Ver, Ter, Em

His/Her — Zir, Hir, Eir, Vis, Tem, Eir

His/Hers — Zis, Hirs, Eirs, Vers, Ters, Eirs

Himself/Herself — Zieself, Hirself, Eirself, Verself, Terself, Emself

  1. “Flatten the Curve.” – Don’t hear too many discussing ‘Flattening the Curve” nowadays.
  2. Supply Chain – You knew the global economy was linked in ways never before imagined. Now you KNOW it.
  3. Cancel Culture – A movement to negate whatever political speech you find inconvenient. Particularly strong on college campuses.
  4. Latinx – Gender-neutral version for people of Hispanic heritage, formerly Latino ad Latina.   I am planning to refer to myself henceforward as HUMANX.
  5. D Variant – Another Covid-19 variant
  6. Omicrom – Yet another Covid variant. This can go on for decades (see above).
  7. Coronavirus – Human coronavirus was first identified in the mid-1960s. Unfortunately, Covid-19 will be far from the last encounter.
  8. Joe Biden – 46th and current President of the United States. Biden has about one half the number of citations as his predecessor.
  9. Donald Trump – 45th president of the United States. Trump has twice as many current citations as his successor, Joe Biden.
  10. Tokyo Olympics – The 2021, nee 2020 Olympics were a modest disappointment, nevertheless a major achievement to have taken place in the midst of a raging worldwide pandemic
  11. Lockdown – At the end of the various national lockdowns; many felt like they had been locked up.
  12. WHO – The World Health Organization, whose charter requires it to help attain “the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health”.
  13. Global Warming – ‘Climate Change’ and/or ‘Global Warming’ have ranked near the top of this list for the entire century, thus far.
  14. January 6 Event at the U.S. Capitol Building, according to Global Citations 1) Attack, 2) Uprising, 3} Insurrection.
  15. Vaccine – Operation Warp Speed has begot a number of vaccines with others, no doubt, to follow.
  16. Afghanistan – The fall and unseemly retreat from Afghanistan cast a pall over an already somber year.

Global Language Monitor began recording the Top Words of the Year in 2000 to document the history of the 21st Century through the English language, the world’s first truly global language. The words are culled throughout the English-speaking world, which as of January 2021 ranks more than 3.18 billion speakers. Global Language Monitor employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global internet and social media analysis.

NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the internet, blogosphere, and the top 300,000 print and electronic global media as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

In addition, the Global Language Monitor has also tracked the Top Words, Phrases and Names of the 21st Century.

More information about these and the company can be found at https://languagemonitor.com/about/about-2/About Global Language Monitor

Based in Austin, Texas, the Global Language Monitor collectively documents, analyzes and tracks trends in language usage worldwide, with a particular emphasis upon the English language. The company is known for its Word of the Year, political analysis, college and university rankings, high-tech buzzwords, and media analytics. For more information, visit Languagemonitor.com.

Media Contact::  Paul JJ Payack

President & Chief Word Analyst
The Global Language Monitor

Austin, Texas 78717
pjjp@post.harvard.edu Private Email

 

How 9/11 Changed the Way Americans Speak

Subtle Yet Profound Differences

Some of These Changes Have Only Become More Profound Over the Years

Austin, Texas, USA. September 11, 2021. (Updated) The Global Language Monitor today released an updated analysis of how the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, The Pentagon, and the pending targets in Washington, D.C., widely suspected to be the White House or the Capitol Building, have changed the way Americans speak in terms of vernacular, word choice and tone.

Updating an earlier analysis completed on the Fifth Anniversary of the attacks, it is a continued and historic change in an ‘unCivil War‘ in terms of the vitriolic exchange currently witnessed on the American Political scene.  According to Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM (www.LanguageMonitor.com), these are a few of the ways where the events of 9/11 have impacted the way Americans speak.

1. 9/11 — The first case is the use of 9/11, itself, as a shorthand for the 2001 terrorist attacks. Using various web metrics, 9/11 outpaces any other name, including the spelled out ‘September 11th” by 7:1 margin. This designation in itself it quite interesting. It is true that Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the Pearl Harbor attack as “December 7th, 1941 as a day which will live in infamy”. But there were no “12/7” rallying cries thereafter. Neither were the dates immortalized of the original battles of the Korean War, the Gulf of Tonkin Incident which preceded the major escalation of the Vietnam War, The First Gulf War, The Afganistan siege, or even the recent Iraqi Invasion. Only the 7/7 attacks on the London Subway system are recorded in common memory by their date (and primarily in the UK in general,  and London in particular).

2. Ground Zero — The name Ground Zero evokes a sacred place, where the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers once stood. It is also revered as a burial ground since thousands of bodies literally vaporized in the ensuing collapse with no remains found whatsoever. Almost universally, it is capitalized as any other proper name, with a few exceptions, most notably the New York Times. Even recently, The Times insisted on referring to Ground Zero in the lower case, calling it ‘the area known as ground zero’ (Sic).  Names are officially bestowed in a number of ways, most often by bureaucratic committees following arcane sets of rules, answering to few. In this case, we kindly request those bureaucrats to follow the lead of hundreds of millions around the world who have formally bestowed upon that special place, the formal name of Ground Zero.

3. Hero — In mythology, heroes were men and women often of divine ancestry endowed with the gifts of courage and strength. In reality, everyday heroes of the late 20th and early 21st centuries were sports figures (‘Be like Mike’ and ‘Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio’), comic book and cartoon characters ala Superman and Spiderman, and all too frequently ‘anti-heroes’ known for the colossal damage they might inflict upon a helpless (and often hapless) world. Into this tableaux, came the heroes of 9/11, very real men and women, rushing into and up the Towers as everyone else was rushing down and out; rushing the cockpit of Flight 93, with knives and forks and steaming hot coffee, forcing the startled highjackers to abandon their plans of crashing into the Capitol or White House rather than the previously unheralded soil of Shanksville, PA; and the men and women who quietly stood their posts at the Pentagon, just doing their duty, not knowing if they would be subjected to another horrific, and more deadly, attack at any moment. In the post-9/11 world, the term has now come to apply to any who place their lives in danger to foster the public good, especially ‘first-responders’ such as: firefighters, EMTs, and police, who quietly place their lives on the line every day.

4. -stan — The suffix in Persian and related languages that means, literally, ‘land of,’ hence, Afghanistan or Land of the Afghans, or Kurdistan (or Kurdish Territories), or even this relatively new moniker: Londonistan.  Talibanistan, referring to Afganistan and the ‘tribal lands’ in Pakistan in the New York Times Sunday Magazine is the latest instantiation.

5. The unCivil War — Since 9/11 after a very short reprieve, the political discourse of American politics has, arguably, descended to its lowest level since the Civil-War era when Lincoln was typically depicted as a know-nothing, Bible-spouting Baboon. Even speech of the Watergate era was spared the hyperbole commonly heard today, as respect for the institution of the presidency remained high.

Today, political opponents are routinely called ‘liars,’ are typically compared to Hitler, Nazis and Fascists; are accused of purposely allowing New Orleans’ inundation in order to destroy disenfranchised elements of our population, and so on. It is very difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of this reaction. It has been suggested that in the face of a nearly invisible, constantly morphing, enemy, we have turned the attack inward, upon ourselves, and our institutions.

 — Paul JJ Payack

British lose the knack for conjuring up new words

The UK is only the sixth-largest country in which English is a common language
The UK is only the sixth-largest country in which English is a common language

English has shrugged off many challengers to become the world’s leading language but the creative contribution of “British English” speakers to the global vocabulary is fading fast, eclipsed by linguistic innovators in technology, international call centres, and film franchises, according to data analysis to be published next week.

The UK still punches above its demographic weight in colourful areas such as politics, royalty, and sex, says research from the Global Language Monitor (GLM), which advises corporations on linguistic shifts.

British words now found around the world include 53X, for sex; Tope, for totally dope or extremely good; and, inevitably, Brexit and Megxit.

But the percentage of new British words adding to the total mass of English-derived words employed around the world has been falling since Queen Victoria’s reign.

The contribution is set to fall further, from 10 percent today to 3 percent by 2060, predicts the report, The Rise and Fall of England as a Word Generator.

[Read the entire article on the Sunday Times site.]

Rise and Fall of England as an English Language Word Generator

England Once Accounted for a Majority of English-language Neologisms.

New Research Shows that the Number of New Words Generated has Fallen to Fewer Than 10% of the Total

Excerpt from the Report

AUSTIN, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, August 16, 2021 — The Sun might have set on the British Empire but the language continues to expand its global dominance though with fewer contributions from the ‘Sceptre’d Isle’.  This is according to a new study to be released later this fall, by the Global Language Monitor.

English has been hailed as the first truly global language inserting itself into nearly every nook and cranny of modern life, thanks to its conquest of science, technology, education, film, fashion, and communications.

According to GLM, a new word is created every 98 minutes, about 14.7 words a day or 5400 words a year.  As of today, GLM’s estimated number of words number is 1,066,095.9 words.   Google’s Ngram word count of millions of English-language books also lists a similar number of words.  According to a study with Harvard University, the count was 1,022,000 English-language words in 2010, within 1.6% of GLM’s estimate at the time.  The study estimated about 8,000 neologisms/year joining the language, while GLM’s analysis put the number at 5400.  Nevertheless, it is a large and growing language.

English über alles?

One problem with the UK maintaining proper ownership (and dominance) of the language it begot) is that it is becoming a smaller and smaller portion of the English-speaking world.

As the number of English Words has grown, so has the number of nations that have a large number of English-language speakers, each generating unique neologisms to suit their particular needs.

Today, tens of thousands of English-language neologisms bubble up from all corners of the planet each year, but only about 5,000 to 8,000 have enough staying power to make into any of the standard dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), Collins, Macmillan, Webster’s Unabridged, American Heritage Dictionary, Macquarie Dictionary, among others.

The Global Language Monitor has three distinct criteria that each new word must meet to be included in the English-language corpus, which GLM refers to as ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’.

  • The word must appear in a minimum of 25,000 citations in a variety of media (Internet,  books, newspapers, research, television, radio)
  • The word must appear in geographies dispersed  across the globe
  • The word must appear in differing cultural segments, industries, and/or  demographic groups

According to the latest available statistics, the UK now stands in sixth place on the list of English-speaking countries, as shown below.  Nevertheless, the list below does raise some interesting questions, for example, the UK is No.6?  The U.S., of course, reigns in the top spot, and perhaps, India is in a well-deserved second place, but Pakistan, Nigeria, and the Philippines at Nos. 3-5?

List of Countries by Number of English Speakers

[Note:  due to variations in statistical methods, some totals can appear slightly out of sequence.]

English-Speaking  Nations By Number of  English Speakers

If you are looking at this list from the perspective of a champion of the former British Empire, you can think about this in two ways:

  • Well done good and faithful servant, or
  • Good riddance, fare they well, the Sun has indeed set upon thee ….

As shown below, Modern English, itself, is an amalgam of dozen or more Proto-Indo-European-Languages, Continue reading “Rise and Fall of England as an English Language Word Generator”

As the Games Wind Down, the Battle Between the Top Partners and Ambushers for the Marketing Gold a “Photo Finish”

Tokyo 2020 Top Partners Vs. Ambushers Arranged Side-by-Side                                     Tokyo 2020 Top Partners Vs. Ambushers Arranged Side-by-Side

Tokyo 2020 Olympics Top Partners and AmbushersTokyo 2020 Olympics Top Partners and Ambushers

Global Language MonitorGlobal Language Monitor

 

The Tokyo Olympics have encountered a host of problems, most of them outside their control. They certainly do not want to be the first Olympics where the Ambushers actually outscored the IOC.”

— Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM.

AUSTIN, TEXAS, UNITED STATES, August 9, 2021   — To the Global Marketing community, the ultimate Olympic race is that between the Olympic Top Partners The Global Language Monitor (GLM) has released the Official Ambush Marketing Rankings for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics found that the Top Olympic Partners and their ambushers are virtually tied according to their Brand Affiliation Index (BAI) scores. At stake is pride and, of course, tens of billions of dollars in advertising and marketing expenditures that will be allotted for the next several years to the winners.

For comparison purposes, GLM created the Economic Value Unit (EVU) that estimates in dollar terms the size of the value leak for each of the Top Partners during the current quadrennial. In like manner, it estimates the value gained by the NAMs or Ambush Marketers.

This is the closest race since GLM has been tracking the numbers since the Beijing Games in 2008”, said Paul JJ Payack.. “The Tokyo Olympics have encountered a host of problems, most of them outside of their control. However, they certainly do not want to be the first Olympics where the Ambushers actually outscored the IOC.”

According to the latest numbers, the mean score for The Top Olympic Partners was 71.43 BAI against a 69.94 BAI for the Non-Affiliated Marketers (NAMs). The final numbers will be announced on Saturday, August 14th.

The Top Olympic Partners for Tokyo 2020 follow:
Aliba
Airbnb.
Atos.
Bridgestone.
Coca-Cola.
Dow.
General Electric.
Intel.
Panasonic.
Procter & Gamble.
Samsung Electronics.
Swatch Group (Omega, Tissot).
Toyota
Visa

The Global Language Monitor’s (GLM) Brand Affiliation Index (BAI), is a proprietary, longitudinal study that analyzes the global association between (and among) individual brands and their competitors or, in this case, the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The Global Language Monitor measured several dozen factors in the study, closely examining all marketing movements extending from London 2012 to Tokyo 2020. GLM has been tracking the Olympics in this manner since the Beijing Summer Games (2008).

Though official numbers are never released, each Top Partner is believed to pays some 100 million USD to the IOC for the privilege. GLM has found that the actual number is closer to 1,000,000,000 USD for each Olympiad, fully loaded. This includes indirect costs associated with the sponsorship such as an apparently endless number of activities, contests, promotional items, and events.

Earlier in 2020 GLM found that the Tokyo 2020 Games had themselves been ambushed by the coronavirus with a remarkable 92.8% correlation to the ongoing Pandemic.

Over the years we’ve met some unlikely ambushers from cartoon characters (Beijing 2008, Kung-fu Panda) to world leaders on the brink of nuclear war (PyeongChang 2018, Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump) but never did we imagine being ambushed by a raging pandemic,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst for the Global Language Monitor.

The study pulls data from hundreds of millions of data points from across the internet and the top 380,000 print, electronic news media outlets, and social networking sites, analyzing sentiment, context, and several other factors to determine which Olympic Top Partners are most closely associated with the Olympic Games — and which brands are being closely associated with the coronavirus pandemic or both. The complete findings are published in the Tokyo 2020 Ambush Marketing Report, which is now available for order.

Going a step further, the GLM study also includes an analysis on how closely brands and a number of their competitors are being affected by the coronavirus, which has been a global concern in the lead-up to the Tokyo Games. “We actually found a remarkable correlation between the coronavirus and the Worldwide Olympic Partners,” Payack continued. “A number of the Brands (and ambushers), actually had nearly as many citations linked to the coronavirus as to the Games themselves. In a few cases, citations to the coronavirus actually exceeded those to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.”

Early this year, the IOC Executive Board expressed its full commitment to the Tokyo Games, scheduled to take place from July 23 to August 8, reporting that all protective measures are being taken to address the coronavirus situation. Lately, the IOC banned all non-athletic visitors from the Games. This situation has steadily deteriorated.

About Global Language Monitor
Based in Austin, Texas, the Global Language Monitor collectively documents,
analyzes and tracks trends in language usage worldwide, emphasizing the Global English language. GLM is known for its Words of the Year, political analysis, college and university rankings, high-tech buzzwords, and the Top Global Fashion Capitals, as well as major global sports events.

For more information, visit Languagemonitor.com.

Media Contact:
Paul JJ Payack
Global Language Monitor
+1 737-215-7750
PJJP@Post.Harvard.edu

ObamaSpeak

Textbook Obama

New York Magazine, September 21, 2009

Which Presidential Orator Did Obama Mimic for His Health-Care Speech?

According to Paul J. J. Payack, a speech analyst with the Austin-based Global Language Monitor, Obama’s health-care speech this week was constructed at a ninth-grade reading level, which was the level at which Lincoln crafted the Gettysburg Address. But that was back when rhetorical flourishes were in vogue. The closest modern equivalent has been Ronald Reagan, whose folksy speeches belied their own competent, clever construction.

.

Obama election tops all news stories since Year 2000

More than double all the other major news events COMBINED

Austin, TX December 29, 2008 (MetaNewswire) – The election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States tops all major news stories since the year 2000 according to a analysis released by the Global Language Monitor (www.LanguageMonitor.com).  In fact citations of Barack Obama in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, and throughout the blogosphere more than double the other main stories of the last decade combined.  These include in descending order:  the Iraq War, the Beijing Olympics, the Financial Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the death of Pope John Paul II, the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and the Asian Tsunami.

Media, Internet & Blogosphere
Rank Story
1 Obama
2 Iraq War
3 Beijing Olympics
4 Financial Tsunami
5 Hurricane Katrina
6 Pope John Paul II
7 9/11 Terrorist Attacks
8 S. Asian Tsunami

When separating out the global print and electronic media alone, GLM found that more stories have appeared about the election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States than the number of stories about Hurricane Katrina (No. 2), the Financial Tsunami (No. 3), and the Iraq War (No. 4) combined. Next on the list of top stories since the Year 2000 include The 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (No. 5), the Beijing Olympics (No. 6), the Death of Pope John Paul II (No.7), and the South Asian Tsunami (No.8) 

The stories were measured in the print and electronic media for a one year period after the event.


Print and Electronic Media
Rank Story
1 Obama
2 Hurricane Katrina
3 Financial Tsunami
4 Iraq War
5 9/11 Terrorist  Attacks
6 Beijing Olympics
7 Pope John Paul II
8 S. Asian Tsunami

“The historical confluence of events in the year 2008 is unprecedented. Aside from Obama’s election, we witnessed the Financial Tsunami which appears to be a vast restructuring of the world economic order, and the Beijing Olympics, which can be viewed as the unofficial welcoming of China into the world community as a nation of the first rank,” said Paul JJ Payack, president and chief word analyst of GLM. “This lends some credence to the idea that on January 20th, 2009 we are about to embark on the second decade of the second millennium.

To the popular mind, History rarely follows chronology: the Fifties ended with JFK’s Assassination in 1963; the Sixties with the Nixon’s resignation in ‘74; the Eighties with the fall of the Berlin Wall; while the Nineties, as well as the 20th century persisted until 9/11/2001.

Obama as a Top Word of the Year

Austin, TX December 5 2008 – In an election cycle known for its many twists and turns, another unexpected result pops up in calculating the Top Words of 2008. According to the analysis performed by the Global Language Monitor’s (www.Languagemonitor.com), the word ‘change’ was the Top Word of 2008, followed by ‘bailout’ and ‘Obamamania’.

“However, it is interesting to note,” said Paul JJ Payack, President and Chief Word Analyst of GLM, “that if you included ‘obama-’ as a root word or word stem, Obama- in its many forms (ObamaMania, Obamamentum, Obmanomics, Obamacize, Obamanation, and even O-phoria and Obamalot as a stand-in for JFK’s Camelot, etc.), would have overtaken both change, and bailout for the top spot. In a year of footnotes, GLM felt it important to add this interesting linguistic twist to the historical record.”

Obama’s oft cited refrain, “Yes, we can!” was ranked third as Phrase of the Year, following “financial tsunami” and “global warming.”  Barack Obama was ranked the Top Name of the Year, followed by George W. Bush and Michael Phelps, the Olympic 8-time gold medal winner.

The analysis was completed using GLM’s Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI), the proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in the media and on the Internet. The words are tracked in relation to frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets, factoring in long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum and velocity.

See also:  Obama as a Top Word of 2008

See also:  ObamaSpeak

See also:  Obama Victory Speach Ranked

See also:  Final Debate — Candidates Differ Sharply

See also:  Obama Acceptance at 9th Grade Level

‘Obama’ as a Word Enters English Language

Watch the Jeanne Moos’ CNN Segment

Presidential names that have made the leap include Jeffersonian,
Lincolnesque, Nixonian, and Clintonesque
San Diego, California, (February 18, 2007) The latest word to enter the English language is ‘obama’ in its many variations, according to the Global Language Monitor (GLM), (www.LanguageMonitor.com). GLM tracks the growth and evolution of the English language around the globe. The word is derived from the name, Barack Obama, the Senator from Illinois, and a top contender for the Democratic nomination for the US Presidency. Obama- is used as a ‘root’ for an ever-expanding number of words, including:
  • obamamentum,
  • obamaBot (new!)
  • obamacize,
  • obamarama,
  • obamaNation,
  • obamanomics,
  • obamican,
  • obamafy,
  • obamamania, and
  • obamacam.
The list is growing. In August 2007, GLM noted that ‘obama’ had become a political buzzword, ranking No. 2 on its Top Political Buzzwords list of the 2008 Presidential Campaign.
Presidential names that have made the leap include Jeffersonian, Lincolnesque, Nixonian, and Clintonesque (referring to former president Bill Clinton).
According to Paul JJ Payack, GLM’s president and chief word analyst, “To enter the English language, a word has to meet certain criteria, including: frequency of appearance in the written and spoken language, in the media, have a large geographic footprint, and to stand the test of time. In the past, this process would unfold over many years, even decades or centuries. However, the Internet, with instant global communication to billions of people has radically accelerated the cycle.”
Many names have made the leap into the language including OK (from the nickname US President Martin Van Buren “Old Kinderhook”); jacuzzi, kodak, macadam,
Caesarian section (after Julius Caesar); decibel (the measure of sound), Hertz, and frisbee.
The Global Language Monitor uses a proprietary algorithm, the Predictive Quantities Indicator (PQI) to track the frequency of words and phrases in the global print and electronic media, on the Internet, throughout the Blogosphere, as well as accessing proprietary databases. The PQI is a weighted Index, factoring in: long-term trends, short-term changes, momentum, and velocity.
Currently, GLM is counting the number of words in the English Language. The Million Word March currently stands just short of the million-word mark at 995,118.
The English Language has some 1.35 billion speakers as a first, second or auxiliary language.

See also:  Obama as a Top Word of 2008

See also:  Obama Victory Speach Ranked

See also: Final Debate — Candidates Differ Sharply

See also:  Obama Acceptance at 9th Grade Level



click
tracking


Top Words for the First 15 Years of the 21st Century & What They Portend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Recently, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) announced that Truth is the Word of the Year for 2017.

 

Austin, Texas, March 3, 2017 (Update) — One hundred years ago, in the year 1915 to be precise, a number of historical trends had already been set in motion that would come to dominate the rest of the century, for better or for ill.   The Global Language Monitor, which tracks global trends through the Big Data-based analysis of Global English, has recently completed a three-year study to better ascertain what trends are we now tracking that will portend future events.

“The first fifteen years of the 20th c. set the trajectory for the remainder of the century — and beyond.”  said Paul JJ Payack, president and Chief Word Analyst, the Global Language Monitor.  “This included the seeds of World War, Bolshevism, Communism, German Nationalism, the carving up of the Middle East without regard to societal structures, total warfare, the introduction of weapons of mass destruction, flight, electrification of rural areas, the internal combustion engine, the dependence on hydrocarbon for fuel, Einstein’s first papers on relativity, the arms race, the explosive growth of cities, and so much more.

If the same can be said for the 21st century at the 15-year mark, what trends can we see that will be likely shape the rest of the 21st century, into the 22nd — and possibly beyond.”

The results for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend follow in the format of Rank, Word or Phrase, Comment, and Trend.They Portend

Top Words for the First 15 Years of 21st Century & the Trends They Portend

Rank Word or Phrase Comment 21st Century Trend
1 Web/Internet (2000) Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance — also reflected in language usage Some argue the most momentous change to human society since the Renaissance. Web 2.0 was the tipping point where the Internet became embedded into everyday life.
2 China (2009) 2015 is the year that China surpasses the US as the Earth’s economic engine in terms of PPE.  If China holds the title for as long as the US, it will be the year 2139 before it turns over the reigns. The Rise of China will dominate 21st century geopolitical affairs like US in the 20th
3 Selfie (2013) Evidently an ego-manical madness gripped the world in 2013-14. The more people populate the planet, the greater the focus on the individual.
4 404 (2013) The near-universal numeric code for failure on the global Internet. 404 will not merely signify the loss of an individual connection but the shutdown of whole sectors of society
5 9/11 (2001) An inauspicious start to the 21st Century. The early 20th c. saw the seeds of Bolshevism, German Nationalism, and Fascism.  The seeds thus planted in the 21st c. are equally foreboding
6 OMG (2008) One of the first texting expressions (Oh my God!), another was BFF as in Best Friend Forever First sign that the Internet would change language. Basically the successor to Morse’s ‘What hath God Wrought?
7 Sustainable (’06) The key to ‘Green’ living where natural resources are wisely conserved and thus never depleted. Made small impact in 2006; its importance grows every year and will continue to do so as resources ARE depleted.
8 Hella (2008) An intensive in Youthspeak, generally substituting for the word ‘very’ as in ‘hella expensive’ The world is being subdivided into the various tribes of youth (Trans national to follow.)
9 N00b (2009) A beginner or ‘newbie’, with numbers (zeroes) replacing the letter Os, emphasizing a new trend in written English The Geeks will inherit the Earth
10 Futebol (2011) Ready or not, the World Cup of Futebol, Futbol, Football, and Soccer was on display in Brasil Sports become an evermore global business
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11 Nanobots and Grey Goo (’07) Have we already witnessed the most horrifying forms of warfare? Not if you haven’t envisioned … … self-replicating nanobots spewing forth ever mounting piles of grey goo might tend to dampen prospects for living things
12 Climate Change (’00) Near the top of word usage list since day one of the century. Focusing on data from the last hundred years actually obscures the magnitude of climate change; paleohistory suggests sea level changes of 300 feet
13  Derivative (’07) Financial instrument or analytical tool that engendered the Meltdown Intertwined global financial institutions have the ability to bring down the entire global electronic system if they falter
14 Apocalypse, Armageddon & variations thereof (2012) The word Apocalypse has been in ascendance in English for some 500 years.  However, recent years has witnessed an unprecedented resurgence Wars and rumors of war appear to be the least of it
15 Occupy (2011) ‘Occupy’ has risen to pre-eminence through Occupy Movement, the occupation of Iraq, and the so-called ‘Occupied Territories’ The gulf between the haves and have nots, the North and the South, the 1% and all the rest has only worsened through a century of unprecedented economic, scientific and social progress
16 Tsunami (2004/5) Southeast Asian Tsunami took 250,000 lives The Southeast Asian Tsunami was a thirty-foot swell that resulted in a quarter of a million deaths. Might a 300-foot rise in sea-level engender a ‘slow Tsunami with deaths in the millions?
17 Inflation (Cosmic) (2014) OK, so that the Universe expanded a gazillion times faster than the speed of light is now a fact.  Way Cool. At the beginning of the 20th c., scientists thought our local galaxy was the entire universe; since then our view of the universe has expanded a billion billion times
18 Singularity (2015) Singularity was originally the name for Cosmic Genesis Event  (the Big Bang), Spoiler Alert:  Now used to describe when computer intelligence surpasses that of humans (Possibly before mid-century).
19 Global Warming  (2000) Rated highly from Day One of the decade The next few hundred (or few thousand) years are gong to be a longer haul than we can now imagine
20 Refugee (2005) After Katrina, refugees became evacuees After Syria, evacuees became migrants.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
21 Emoticon (2013) Words without letters conveying emotional responses, such as smileys :-) Emoticons. Smileys, Emoji’s  communication continues to evolve in unexpected ways
22 Emoji (2014) In 500 years people will look back on the creation of a new alphabet (the alphaBIT):  Letters + numbers + (emoticons) diacritical marks + emoji (picture words). The arrival of the new English Alphabet (the AlphaBIT) is apparently at hand
23 Pope Francis (2013) Also Top Name of the Year for 2013. A new type of Pontiff sets the stage for all those Popes who follow …
24 WMD (2002) Iraq’s (Non-existent) Weapons of Mass Destruction The nuclear device dropped Hiroshima weighed tons, the new backpack versions, mere pounds.
25 Telomeres (2015) Telomeres are the caps at the end of each strand of DNA that protect our chromosomes. When telomeres wear away, the chromosomes are destroyed, and death ensues.  The goal: protect telomeres, extend life
26 German Ascendance (2015) One of the architects of the European Union, German Chancellor Angela Merkel continues her reign as the most powerful woman on the planet Germany’s tragic misadventures of the 20th c., belie its dominance of the Euro Zone in the 21st.
27 Anthropocene (2015) A proposed geologic epoch when humans began to impact natural processes An impact that will only grow for better or ill throughout the century.
28 God Particle (2011) The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues its quest for the Higgs boson, popularly known as the God Particle. Scientists have calculated a one in fifty million chance that the LHC will generate a small black hole that could devour the Earth.
29 Denier (2014) An ugly new addition to the trending words list as it has become an evermore present invective with sinister overtones (fully intended). Political discourse continues to sink to unprecedented levels
30 Carbon Footprint (2008) The amount of carbon released in a process or activity Burning a gallon of petrol produces enough CO² to melt 400 gallons of ice at the poles.
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
31  Slumdog (2008) Child inhabitants of Mumbai’s slums Slumdogs continue to multiply as MegaCities continue to seemingly endlessly expand
32 Truthiness (2006) Steven Colbert’s addition to the language appears to be a keeper; While something may not meet the standard of truth, it certainly appears to be true Truthiness seems to set the new standard, unfortunately
33 Change (2008) The top political buzzword of the 2008 US Presidential campaign Change will continue as a top word into the 22nd century — and beyond
34 Chinglish (2005) The Chinese-English Hybrid language growing larger as Chinese influence expands Chinese-English will inevitably cross-fertilize as the two great economic powers contend into the 22nd Century
35 Google (2007) Founders misspelled actual word ‘googol’ Is Google the prototype of the a new “Idea foundry’
36 Twitter (2009) The ability to encapsulate human thought in 140 characters The ability to encapsulate human thought in wisps of wind (or electron streams) will almost certainly follow
37 H1N1 (2009) More commonly known as Swine Flu Swine Flu, Bird Flu, Ebola, it will only get worse with the hand of man only abetting the enemy
38 Bubble (2007) One financial bubble after another as we move into the 21st century Let’s see: Communism, socialism, fascism, command economies, the silent hand of the market, China’s hybrid — evidently the business cycle will persist
39 The Great War (2014) The centennial of World War I begins four years of soulful commemorations — as the forces it unloosed continue to ripple into (and most probably through) the 21st c. As the Great War (and the ravages thereof} continue into the 21st c., what at the odds that its ramifications will continue throughout the 21st
40 Political Transparency (2007) A noble idea from the Campaign that was among the first casualties of the Obama Administration The explosion of knowledge portends less transparency not more …
Copyright ©2015 Global Language Monitor
To see the Top Words of 2014

The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 1.83 billion speakers (January 2013 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time.   NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

About the Global Language Monitor

Early in the last century, The Global Language Monitor (GLM) was founded in Silicon Valley by Paul J.J. Payack on the understanding that new technologies and techniques were necessary for truly understanding the world of Big Data, as it is now known.  Silicon Valley is located in what is now the CaliMinor Federation.

Today, from its home in Austin, Texas GLM provides a number of innovative products and services that utilize its ‘algorithmic services’ to help worldwide customers protect, defend and nurture their branded products and entities. Products include ‘brand audits’ to assess the current status, establish baselines, and competitive benchmarks for current intellectual assets and brands, and to defend products against ambush marketing.

These services are currently provided to the Fortune 500, the Higher Education market, high technology firms, the worldwide print and electronic media, and the global fashion industry, among others.

For more information, call 1.512.801.6823, email info@LanguageMonitor.com, or visit www.LanguageMonitor.com.




‘Truth’ is Top Word, ‘Weinstein Effect’ the Top Phrase and ‘Xi Jinping’ the Top Name in Global English for 2017

Summary:  “Since the turn of the century, the Global Language Monitor has been naming the words of global English that have had the most profound influence upon the language, the culture, and/or the world of the 21st century,” said Paul JJ Payack, President, and Chief Word Analyst. “GLM ‘s methodology, true to its Silicon Valley heritage, is to examine the totality of Global English with the tools now available to better understand the underlying trends that shape our words and, hence, our world. Our goal remains to detect these small changes in the language that often presage titanic shifts in the way humans communicate.”

The Global Language Monitor’s 18th Annual Edition

 

For Immediate Release,

For More Information, call 001.512.801.6823 or email info@LanguageMonitor.com.

November 16, 2017,  Austin, Texas – Truth has been named the 2017 Word of the Year for Global English (#WOTY2017) by the Global Language Monitor, in its eighteenth annual global analysis. In addition, the Weinstein Effect has been named the Top Phrase and Chinese leader Xi Jingping the Top Name of 2017.  Following ‘Truth’ were the words Narrative, Opioids, Awoke, and Nuclear Option.  Rounding out the Top Ten were Deep State, Robot Apocalypse, Higher Level of Fake News, Blessee, and Lean Into. 

Since the turn of the century, the Global Language Monitor has been naming the words of global English that have had the most profound influence upon the language, the culture, and/or the world of the 21st century,” said Paul JJ Payack, President, and Chief Word Analyst.

GLM ‘s methodology, true to its Silicon Valley heritage, is to examine the totality of Global English with the tools now available to better understand the underlying trends that shape our words and, hence, our world.

Our goal remains to detect these small changes in the language that often presage titanic shifts in the way humans communicate.”

In the recent past, some of the shifts first noted by the trend and narrative-tracking techniques of GLM include:

  1. The use of number sequences as clearly defined words (Y2k, Web 2.0)
  2. The use of Twitter as a new form of stylized human communication (2008)
  3. The introduction of emoji symbols as an addition to and transformation of the alphabet (2012)
  4. The rise of the Narrative presaging the rise of ‘fake news’ and the decline of ‘truth-based’ journalism. (2006)
  5. The mounting impact of the ‘sustainability’ and ‘Green’ movements (2006)
  6. The Rise of Microaggressions as a significant form of ‘bullying’ (2015)
  7. The continued emergence of English as the first truly global language (2000-)
  8. Big Data as the most frequently used but least understood word in High Technology (2011)
  9. The application of data mining techniques to global English to better understand the significance of global events and trends (2013)
  10. The Rise of China as the most significant (and de-stabilizing) event of the 21st century, thus far. (2008)
  11. Unveiling the racist underpinnings behind the rise of Fake News.

GLM has used these technologies to track political and social trends.

The eighteenth year of the 21st century provided words that accompanied the outsized geopolitical events of the age:  nuclear diplomacy, shattered trade alliances, the rise (and re-emergence) of nationalism in various parts of the planet, as well as varying degrees of ‘wokeness’ and intense debates over the role of the past in the present-day world.  Perhaps, most surprisingly, a debate over the nature of truth worthy of Athenian philosophers, of 12th-century Schoolmen — and the 18th c. Founders is currently quite the rage.

 

Global Language Monitor’s 2017 Words of the Year for Global English

Rank, Word, Previous Rank, Definition 

  1.  Truth (1) — Let’s face it.  The conversation is all about truth, or lack thereof.
  2.  Narrative (2) — As GLM noted in ’08, Narratives began replacing facts in politics; a harbinger to ‘fake news’.
  3.  Opioids (10) — More deaths than gun violence and automobiles crashed combined.
  4.  Post-Truth (16) — Objective facts are less influential than appeals to emotion or the prevailing narrative.
  5. Woke (New) — Awakening to issues of social and racial justice.
  6. Brexit (4) — [United Kingdom] Definition according to Theresa May:  “Brexit means Brexit”.
  7. Blessee (New) — [RSA, South Africa] Those who are shown financial favor through a ‘Sugar Daddy’ (New)
  8. Non-binary (13) — Gender identity defined as neither male nor female.
  9. Anthropocene (15) — The current geological time period where human activities have had a major environmental impact on the Earth.
  10. Latinx (11) — Neologism for the Hispanic heritage of any stripe.
  11. Ransomware (New) — A type of malware where targeted sites are ‘captured’ and rendered useless until a ransom is paid to the hackers.
  12. Tradie (New) — [Australia] Short for any worker in the trades:  tradesmen, e.g., electricians (sparkies), truckers (truckies), chippies (carpenter) and the like.
  13. Flip (New) — Any quick financial transact5on meant to turn a quick profit, particularly involving real estate.
  14. Covfefe — The Trumpian Typo Heard ‘Round the world.
  15. #Resist — From Latin resistere, from re- + sistere to take a stand
  16. Appropriation (Cultural) — Now refers to the exploitation of an ‘ethnic’ culture by those of white European heritage.

Missed the Cut and former rank: Antifa (18), Alt-right (17), Bigly (5), and Populism (19)

 

Global Language Monitor’s 2017 Top Phrases of the Year for Global English

Rank, Word, Previous Rank, Definition

  1.  Weinstein Effect (New) — (#MeToo) Emboldened women across the globe confront those who have been abused them in their past.
  2. Nuclear Option (7) — The use of nuclear weapons by either side in the on-going and decades-long North Korean standoff.
  3.  Deep State (New) — The idea that entrenched bureaucracies, beholden to no one, controlling the ship of state with little concern for elected officials.  In effect, a ‘Shadow’ government
  4. For Real (FR) (New) — [Indian] It took a half a century for the hip lingo of Venice Beach to proliferate to the call centers of India as FR.
  5. Robot Apocalypse (New) — The oncoming usurpation of Humankind by robots and other advanced forms of Artificial Intelligence.
  6. Fake News (New) — A higher level (and far more dangerous method controlling the news) through special relationships, the tight control of events, planting sources, and keeping the actual facts to a tight inner circle.
  7. Lean Into (New) — Being totally committed (or lean into) a cause, an initiative, or career choice.
  8. Non-binary (13) — Gender identity defined as neither male nor female.
  9. Memory Care (14) — Euphemism for treating Alzheimer and other forms of dementia
  10. Cultural Appropriation — Now refers to the exploitation of an ‘ethnic’ culture by those of white European heritage.

Missed the Cut and former rank: Alt-right (17), Dumpster Fire (9), Nuclear Option for US Senate (6), and Safe Place (20).

 

Global Language Monitor’s 2017 Top Names of the Year

Rank, Name

  1. Xi Jinping — General Secretary of the Communist Party of China
  2. Donald J. Trump — President of the United States of America; Trump took the Top Honors in 2016 and 2015.
  3. Pope Francis —  Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church, the Bishop of Rome, and sovereign of Vatican City.
  4. Angela Merkel —  Angela Dorothea Merkel, Chancellor of Germany
  5. Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin —  President of Russia
  6. Theresa May — P)rime Minister of the United Kingdom
  7. Kim Jung Un —   North Korean Strongman
  8. Narendra Modi — Prime Minister of India
  9. Donald Tusk — President of the European Commission
  10. Shinzō Abe — Prime Minister of Japan
  11. Justin Trudeau — Prime Minister of Canada

 

The Top Words, Phrases, and Names since the Turn of the Century

2016:
Top Words: No. 1 Truth, No. 2 Narrative, No. 3, #Resist
Top Phrases: No. 1 Make America Great Again No. 2 When they go low, we go high No. 3 The Electoral College
Top Names: No. 1 Donald Trump, No. 2 Vladimir Putin, No. 3 Neil Gorsuch

2015:
Top Words: No. 1 Microaggression (Safe Space, Trigger, Unsafe, Snowflake, White Privilege)
Top Phrases: No. 1 Migrant Crisis, No. 2 Je Suis Charlie, No. 3 Almond Shaming
Top Names: No. 1 Donald J. Trump, No. 2 Alan Kurdi, No. 3 Pope Francis

2014:
Top Words: No. 1 The Heart ♥ Emoji (for love), No. 2 Hashtag, No. 3 Vape
Top Phrases: No. 1 Hands Up, Don’t Shoot; No. 2 Cosmic Inflation, No. 3 Global Warming
Top Names: No. 1 Ebola, No. 2 Pope Francis, No. 3 World War

2013:
Top Words: No. 1 ’404’, No.2 Fail, No.3 Hashtag
Top Phrases: No. 1 Toxic Politics, No. 2 Federal Shutdown, No.3 Global Warming/Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1. Pope Francis, No. 2 ObamaCare, No.3 NSA

2012:
Top Words: No. 1 Apocalypse / Armageddon, No.2 Deficit, No. 3 Olympiad
Top Phrases: No. 1 Gangnam Style, No. 2 Climate Change/Global Warming, No. 3 Fiscal Cliff
Top Names: No. 1 Newtown and Malala Yousafzai, No. 3 Xi Jinping

2011:
Top Words: No. 1 Occupy, No.2 Fracking, No.3 Drone
Top Phrases: No. 1 Arab Spring, No. 2 Royal Wedding, No.3 Anger and Rage
Top Names: No. 1 Steve Jobs, No. 2 Osama bin-laden and Seal Team Six, No.3 Fukushima

2010:
Top Words: No. 1 Spillcam, No. 2 Vuvuzela, No. 3 The Narrative
Top Phrases: No. 1 Anger and Rage, No. 2 Climate Change, No. 3 The Great Recession
Top Names: No. 1 Hu Jintao, paramount leader of China, No. 2 iPad, No. 3 Barack Obama

2009:
Top Words: No. 1 Twitter, No. 2 Obama-, No. 3 H1N1
Top Phrases: No. 1 King of Pop, No. 2 Obama-mania, No. 3 Climate Change
Top Names: No. 1 Obama, No. 2 Michael Jackson, No. 3 Mobama

2008:
Top Words: No. 1 Change, No. 2 Bailout, No. 3 Obama-mania
Top Phrases: No. 1 Financial Tsunami, No. 2 Global Warming, No. 3 “Yes, We Can!”
Top Names: No. 1 Barack Obama, No. 2 George W. Bush, No.3 Michael Phelps

2007:
Top Words: No. 1 Hybrid (representing all things green), No. 2: Surge
Top Phrase: Climate Change
Top Name: Al Gore

2006:
Top Word: Sustainable
Top Phrase: Stay the Course
Top Name: Dafur

2005:
Top Words: No. 1, Refugee No. 2: Tsunami No. 3: Katrina
Top Phrase: Outside the Mainstream
Top Name: (acts of ) God

2004:
Top Word: Incivility (for inCivil War)
Top Phrase: Red States/Blue States No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Dubya/Rove

2003:
Top Word: Embedded
Top Phrase: Shock and Awe, No. 2: Rush to War
Top Name: Saddam Hussein, No. 2 Dubya

2002:
Top Word: Misunderestimate
Top Phrase: Threat Fatigue
Top Name: W (Dubya)

2001:
Top Word: Ground Zero
Top Phrase: ‘Lets Roll’
Top Name: The Heros

2000:
Top Word: Chad
Top Phrase: Dot.com
Top Name: W (Dubya)

Methodology:  The words are culled from throughout the English-speaking world, which now numbers more than 2.35 billion speakers (January 2018 estimate) GLM employs its NarrativeTracker technologies for global Internet and social media analysis. NarrativeTracker is based on global discourse, providing a real-time, accurate picture about any topic, at any point in time. NarrativeTracker analyzes the Internet, blogosphere, the top 300,000 print and electronic global media, as well as new social media sources as they emerge.

For More Information, go to LanguageMonitor.com or call 001.512.801.6823.

 




Number of Words in the English Language

1,041,257.5

Number of Words in the English Language, January 1, 2017, estimate

Shakespeare Created 1700 Words in His Lifetime
The English Language passed the Million Word threshold on June 10, 2009, at 10:22 a.m. (GMT).
Currently, there is a new word created every 98 minutes or about 14.7 words per day.

 

Next Global English Milestone

 

 




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The Future of Global English (400 Years in the Future)

MicroEssay by Paul JJ Payack

The conquest of Global English is nearly complete. It is impossible to hold back this tide. The Tsunami of English has already swept over the earth. The question now is how to adjust to this new reality.

I have several suggestions. The first would be to master the language. Yes, acknowledge the sea-change, disassociate yourself from any political misgivings — and get on with it. Global English is here and now — and here to stay. Global English will reside, preside and thrive. At least in some form. Here are some possible threads of evolution (or devolution) of the language over the next 400 years. I chose this perspective because that is the same temporal distance we are from the days of Shakespeare and the King James Bible.

Keeping in mind that the best way to predict the future is to read the past, here are a number of differing scenarios, one of which will be the future of Global English

1. Cyber English: The robots take control of the language. This form of English would be ‘clipped’ and very precise (no ‘fuzzy’ logic here). Come to think of it, this would be a great leap backward to the time of the King’s English, as spoken in, say, Colonial India.

2. The Romanticization of English: The Language devolves into various local dialects that in time become robust languages in themselves. The precedent for this, of course, is Latin splintering into the Romance Languages (Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish). As Latin is still the Official Language of the Vatican City state, English will remain spoken in certain enclaves in North Carollina, western Virginia, and in the Desert Southwest.

3. Return to Proto-Indo-European. Not as outlandish as it might seem, as the Green movement decries the technological basis of much of Global English, and in a Back-to-Basics promotes the original P-I-E as a ‘green language’.

4. English captured by the Chinese: the Middle Kingdom strikes back and begins to stake a claim in English Language ownership, much as America has done so during the last century. The Chinese prove to be excellent caretakers of the language and develop many interesting ways to extend it throughout the Earth and beyond.

5. Revenge of the Nerds: Leetspeak Strikes Back. The Nerds control the language. All words have dozens of spellings and meanings. Letters, numbers and symbols intermix. Exposition is heavily encrypted. The precedent: The English language before the Noah Webster and the OED. Shakespeare’s many variations on his name is mere child’s play to the near-infinite variety of spelling your children’s children will be able to use for their names.

6. The Number of Words in the English Language
Academics will no longer fret at counting the number of words because the conquest of English will no longer be tainted by political, cultural, and social concerns. Once freed from these concerns, Everyone will be free to count words in the same manner that their scientific colleagues count the number of galaxies, stars and atomic nuclei.

We will then be able to count ALL the words: every name of every fungus, all the technical jargon, YouthSpeak, all the –Lishes, everything.

Dictionaries will not longer be the arbiters what’s a word? Questions of standing the test of time will be rendered inoperable. Words will bubble forth as a frothy sea-foam of insight and meaning. If a word is used by millions or even thousands of influential elites, regardless of class or any form of identity (gender, ethnic, class, national, or social) it will be deemed a word and recorded for posterity.

7. There will be no words only thoughts. This is a rather difficult scenario to explore, since words all but disappear. Dictionaries will be replaced by something much more ethereal, sort of like a directory of dreams, ideas and ideals.

The language will swell to tens of millions of ‘words’ and the fact of its crossing the 1,000,000, word barrier will be looked upon something quite quaint that happened in the ‘classic days’ of ‘Global English language (long before it assumed its then-current exalted position. In all probability, the words in this essay may seem closer to the works of Shakespeare and those of the King James Bible than those of the, say, twenty-fifth Century.

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